4 Jun 2011

Picasso, Miro, Dali-Angry Young Men: The Birth of Modernity

This is a fascinating exhibition on the relationships between the Picasso, Dali and Miro, currently exhibited at the Foundation Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, Italy until 17th July. This exhibition documents the influences each artist had on each other, the wider painting scene in Spain, and in turn, the legacy they left on the culture of the early Twentieth Century and the development of modernism. What is also interesting about this exhibition is how the strong political convictions are explored especially with regard to the early Picasso and Miro pieces, many not exhibited before. there is also some strong abstract, semi-abstract works by both artists. There is a walk through each room here. The show is curated by Eugenio Carmona, Christoph Vitali.

Pablo Picasso 'Harlequin and his Girlfriend' 1901, Pushkin Museum
'The exhibition is dedicated to the early work of Picasso, Miró and Dalí, which played a decisive role in the beginning of modern art in Spain. The exhibition concentrates on Picasso's pre-cubist period 1900 - 1905, whilst Juan Miró's works of 1915-1920 are presented along with Salvador Dali's from 1920-1925, both artists painting in the period before the discovery of surrealism. Each artist will be represented by 25 - 30 masterpieces selected to show aspects of the three artists in their earliest periods, works that are rarely shown in mainstream catalogues and exhibitions. For instance, Picasso's early work was often coloured by his strong political convictions.

Joan Miro 'Poem Painting' c.1925
In Madrid in 1901, Picasso and his anarchist friend Francisco de Asís Soler founded the magazine Arte Joven (Young Art), which published five issues. Picasso illustrated the journal, mostly contributing grim cartoons depicting and sympathizing with the state of the poor. Miró too understood art as political, and Miró's oft-quoted assassination of painting is derived from a dislike of bourgeois art of any kind, especially when used as a way to promote cultural identity among the wealthy. Specifically, Miró saw Cubism in this way, and he is quoted as saying I will break their guitars, referring to Picasso and Braque's early Cubist paintings. Much younger than Picasso and Miró, Dalí was expelled from the Academia in 1926 shortly before his final exams when he stated that no one on the faculty was competent enough to examine him. His mastery of painting skills is well documented in his early works, such as the flawlessly realistic Girl at the window, which was painted in 1926. That same year he made his first visit to Paris where he met with Pablo Picasso, whom young Dalí revered - Picasso had already heard favourable things about Dalí from Joan Miró.'


5 comments:

thige said...

Bonjour David,dans l"arlequin" on devine la forte influence de Toulouse Lautrec,:-)

David said...

Bonjour Thige, vous avez raison! Expressionnisme a été une telle force motrice dans les premières années du modernisme, mais souvent mal compris, en particulier l'expressionnisme allemand, que j'aime, malgré mes tendances abstraites puriste! ...

thige said...

Bonjour David, j'ai le même amour pour l'expressionnisme allemand ainsi que pour le romantisme allemand comme par exemple l'écrivain merveilleux Archim Von Arnim; c'est deux courants ne sont ils pas à l'origine de bouleversements artistiques,une sorte de métaphysique de la matière qui fait entrer l'abstraction dans le monde contemporain? :-) à bientôt;

David said...

Merci Thiebaut. Vous ne pouvez pas battre un peu de romantisme allemand, je connais un peu de Von Arnim, mieux que Byron! J'aime que «la métaphysique de la matière» J'en conviens, mais comment pouvons-nous aller au-delà de la nature expressionniste / métaphysique de l'abstraction dans 21st century?..

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